Is Redline Good For Your Car's Engine? Italian Tune Up


  • Am Vor Monat

    Engineering ExplainedEngineering Explained

    Dauer: 9:28

    Does The Italian Tune Up (Redlining Your Engine) Actually Work?
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    Does a redline a day keep the mechanics away? The Italian Tune Up is often thought of as a solution for removing carbon from an engine, but does it really work? Looking into multiple research papers on the subject, I sought to answer three main questions: 1). What temperatures do carbon deposits form? 2). Can carbon deposits be removed from excessive heat? 3). Can engines get hot enough to remove carbon deposits?
    An engine's redline is the highest speed it can safely operate. At this engine speed, you'll generally be at higher loads, and the stress and strain on the engine is high. Cylinder temperatures increase with the production of more power, and this heat can have effects on the engine internals. Is it enough to remove carbon deposits? Check out the video to find out!
    Referenced Literature:
    Direct Injection Intake Valve Deposits: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/2016-01-2252/
    Piston Temperature Effects On Deposits: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/940948/
    Intake Valve Temperatures: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/971729/
    How Deposits Form In Engines: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/931032/
    Measuring Piston Temperatures: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/2011-01-0407/
    Suppressing Direct Injection Deposits: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/1999-01-3656/
    Engine Conditions Deposit Formation: www.sae.org/publications/technical-papers/content/2015-01-1943/
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    redline  car engine  italian tune up  carbon deposits  turbocharger  supercharger  horsepower  torque  high revving engine  fast car  redline good  redline bad  is redlining bad  is redline bad  does the italian tune up work  science  engineering  

Engineering Explained
Engineering Explained

Hope everyone's having a wonderful day! I made a video a while back about why engines lose power over time (summarized with 10 reasons), which feels relevant to this video, for anyone interested. Here's the link! http://youtu.be/uj8hjAjI7p4

Vor Monat
Ride84XL
Ride84XL

Really intresting! It didn't actually surpriced me that you can clean off deposits by heat. The question is mostly - how well will the engine do at the temperatures required. I use heat for cleaning grill grates all the time using my furnace, that I have built. I use to go higher in temperature though - about 500-600°C. At that point, carbon also starts to react with oxygen in the air forming carbon dioxide - wich makes it disapphear from the surface without any mechanical work (all that's left is ashes, that's very easy to remove). It's also not surpricing that 200°C is where it sticks at it's worst, because it's the same with grease on grill grates, pans and stove tops. After all, the deposits are carbon mixed with oil and fuel residue - most oils and fat probably have similar properties.

Vor 7 Tage
The Living Spirit
The Living Spirit

I know that stretch of road your on. Can’t get fast enough to heat those pistons there. To many turns

Vor 11 Tage
Alaric Balthi
Alaric Balthi

I had a carburetor "powered" car once that didn't get below the emission requirement, no matter what i tried. I was super pissed and decided to try revving the engine to either A) blow up or B) remove everything besides the aluminium and steel from the engine. As it was not injected and the ingnition didn't cut at any point, i revved the sh*t i out of it by driving couple of times up and down this steep and long hill nearby. Man, that engine cried! But it held together and i went immediately to get it tested and it passed with flying colours! That thing was tough! I had it couple of years before i had to let it go but for me, italian tuneup worked. Oh, the car? Peugeot 205. Have had two of those and i just love them.

Vor 26 Tage
Kevin Benfield
Kevin Benfield

Engineering Explained is this why Honda designed vtec?

Vor Monat
NickFury
NickFury

+Meme Master i was referencing diesel pickups, which are a different animal. Generally in the cold the big diesel can coke up valves if left idling too long with no loads, they can even start to wash the cyls down with fuel. As far as diesel cars i have little experience.

Vor Monat
opexo
opexo

The biggest reasons for losing power is dropping the compression. And apart from a hole in your piston or valve, the biggest problem is stuck piston rings due to carbon build-up in their grooves. Apart from not changing the oil regularly (and/or using the wrong oil or oil with poor quality), the biggest contributors to this problem is driving car in the lower rev range. Revving it harder makes the piston rings to heat-up and expand more aggressively, braking up from the carbon deposits. Revving it harder rises up the temperature and the deposits are burned up. Revving it harder makes the oil squirted beneath the piston crown and through the oil galleries wash away the carbon deposits. Driving the engine in the lower revs causes the oil to pass slower through the oil galleries essentially causing it to spend more time in heated area before passing away which contributes to that decomposing effect of elements in the oil which in turn stick to the walls in the oil galleries much like clogging up heart arteries (look up Peugeot 1.6 HDI engine blowing turbos frequently). Revving the engine causes the piston rings to rotate in their grooves helping to keep away the carbon deposits. Similarly, revving the engine high enough causes the valves to float and rotate essentially cleaning itself and its valve seat making it seal better. VERY IMPORTANT NOTE AHEAD!!!: all above for revving the engine helping it live better is true and also remember these things are pretty good engineered mechanically, HOWEVER! do NOT rev them near the red line or even keep them there for period of time!!! The red line is there for a reason. There are many reasons and here is one: in 99.9% of the vehicles on the road the valves are retracted in their position by spring which after years of work loses even a little part of its strength. By revving the engine in the red line if you see your valves closing in slow motion they are bouncing on the calve seat 1-2 times before settling on each rev. The forces acting there are great and at one moment the valve stem can snap resulting in catastrophic engine failure. So yes, rev your engines, drive them in the higher rpm range from time to time, but stay away from red line! In maybe more than 90% of the engines there is power loss anyway in some 500rpm before the red line so essentially you are losing if you don't shift-up a gear. Happy revving. edit: oh, and one more note: revving your engine does not necessarily mean to drive faster! Just stick to your lower gears to keep the cops away and everybody else safe!

Vor 5 Stunden
dlb83082
dlb83082

water methanol injection - no carbon

Vor 8 Stunden
Mark G
Mark G

Here is my version of an Italian tune-up : I put some gas treatment with P.E.A. in the tank and run the car on the highway with the transmission dropped down 1 or 2 gears to keep the RPM's high and the engine hot. then accelerate and decelerate over and over. The more time the better.

Vor 12 Stunden
Stefan Klar
Stefan Klar

Seeing that Volvo 245 made me happy ❤️

Vor 13 Stunden
Elle Sea
Elle Sea

Jaguar once had a test fleet of XJ12s that had never failed. Because they were frequently taken to redline. In that case, I believe the issue was breathing in the two valve head.

Vor 21 Stunde
ProdigalPorcupine
ProdigalPorcupine

I’ve often found that turbo diesels previously owned by shopping trip grannies benefit greatly from a good thrashing. It blows a lot of smoke at first, then it settles down. It noticeably or even quite dramatically improved performance. It’s probably cleaning the injectors out, they’ve likely never been open properly in their lives! Dirty injectors can also leak fuel causing excessive smoke, it seems to help that as well. No need for red line, though. Quiet road, car thoroughly warmed up, full throttle through the gears, changing before red line.

Vor Tag
sully676
sully676

I've had luck using BG products intake cleaner on cleaning carbon off of intake valves in DFI engines

Vor Tag
KushForThought-
KushForThought-

If your still on a stock clutch and the car is 10+ years old I would say no, clutch might blow out when you go to shift

Vor Tag
TCPUDPATM PORTS
TCPUDPATM PORTS

I like how we got a whole bunch of road noise and wind noise, but no sweet sound of that Italian engine

Vor Tag
Richard King ADI
Richard King ADI

If tyhe engine didn't need 'cleaning', then no effect will be felt. If the rings were a bit 'sticky' due to soft carbon deposits, then perhaps a bit of hard running might clear them and inprove compression/sealing?

Vor Tag
sadams7114
sadams7114

Redline a day, keeps the carbon away.

Vor Tag
Oscar Flyer
Oscar Flyer

Wrong preposition. The heat and shock cooling cycle of hight wot/load temps and the engine breaking cool off that makes the carbon dislodge. If you don´t know that, you´re out, Jason. It´s an expansion and shrinkage relation that is difference between metal and carbon that makes the job.

Vor 3 Tage
Shiro Yasha
Shiro Yasha

this guy can do chemistry while driving I cant even think on what to make for dinner while driving

Vor 3 Tage
ae70gts
ae70gts

italian tune up isnt just revving it for 5 or 10 minutes... italian tune up works. if you live in the city and the daily car/bike gets back and forth from home to work children at school etc etc. the cars hp fall daily. if you take a summer trip and use the highway and sustain 120+ with 3500rpm and above for 1 hour or more .... thats the italian tune up... when you get back to daily routine youll notice a big differnce in your cars power... fuel efficiency

Vor 3 Tage
8 year old
8 year old

Green is good not Red

Vor 3 Tage
Lucifer Light
Lucifer Light

No

Vor 4 Tage
Over Opinionated Bogan
Over Opinionated Bogan

To get best performance from acceleration from your car you only need to go about 500 rpm above max torque point. So no redline is not good. Good way to blow your head and wear out your rings.

Vor 5 Tage
Blue Wizz
Blue Wizz

Man... you basically promoting electric cars

Vor 5 Tage
Patrick Whitehead
Patrick Whitehead

Was the 240 wagon on the side of the road for sale?!

Vor 5 Tage
Ronald de Rooij
Ronald de Rooij

I don't know, but if I drive any car at high (legal) speeds for hours at an end like on vacation, it really seems to be a bit peppier afterwards. It does not last very long, though. I have no idea why. It might be just me, but the difference, although not dramatic, is noticeable. I noticed it in every car I ever owned. I would describe it as "reacting to the gas pedal input better".

Vor 5 Tage
András Szabó
András Szabó

It definitely works for me. but I don't drive fast. when the engine is warmed up already I used to speed up slowly in 3rd gear up to 5-6000 revolutions. I keep it there for some time and then I switch to higher gear. I do it this way because there is not extra fuel wasted, and does not put much wear on the engine neither. It works with all of our cars (carburetor and injection), and the engine runs much cleaner in general. When I took them to the emission test the technician didn't want to believe to his eyes, the carburetor engine did not produce CO until 5000 revs. Above that was 0.01%. :)

Vor 5 Tage
Tony Mouannes
Tony Mouannes

Driving uphill on a mountain highway with lots of curves do the trick (without having to worry about rpm or any technical stuff).

Vor 5 Tage
Nathan Van Pelt
Nathan Van Pelt

Carboculating is what i do to my weed before i eat it

Vor 5 Tage
Pete Zaitcev
Pete Zaitcev

This sort of thing is sometimes necessary in airplanes, although in that case there's no PCV and the carbon is mostly forming because of the mixture being too rich. I had a bit problem on IO-360 where plugs would foul with carbon (not lead). It was possible to get it out with a postcard, so it wasn't a solid carbon deposit. It would burn out on full power. Eventually, I swapped the plugs and that cured the problem (the initial formation was apparently because of ineffective ignition, so that combusting from the other plug was burning through the affected plug).

Vor 6 Tage
sasja de vries.
sasja de vries.

Well, engine load on modern cars is not really dependant on throttle position. Modern economy engines run hotter anyway. Leaner fuel makes it run hotter, during performance driving the A/F mixture is richer. One of the things that do help to reduce deposits is polishing and porting the intake, so that there are no spots for the carbon to hang onto. Correlating deposits to throttle position or RPMs for engines in general is just wrong, you can only do it for one engine with one setup and one tune. And some mechanics say that just taking an engine apart and leaving a carboned up part in the open air for a few weeks weakens the carbon layer, sometimes to a point where it can just fall of (in chunks) on it's own. I do know a method how to get your intake valves really hot, just let it run on gas and let it run lean. With gas I mean LPG or CNG, not that what you should be calling petrol or benzine. Gasses like LPG and CNG are more flexible in the A/F ratios it can run on, it can run on A/F ratios that a normal petrol engine would stall on. But if you do so, your engine and especially the valve do get hotter. And guess what: most of the reasons why people complain their LPG engine has a low lifespan, backfires or reduced engine compression are because of the intake valves getting too hot and because someone or something leaned out the A/F ratio. On a diesel engine you get less power when you lean it out, a petrol engine will get less stable, stall, etc (when you lean it out too much), but on LPG it will be running smoothly with just a bit less power (just like a diesel car). So you don't notice something is wrong, then your valves become hotter and after a while you will notice the problems. You simply shouldn't call gasoline "Gas", because it's not a gas, it's a liquid. Call it petrol, benzine, isooctane, benziños or at least gasoline. --- The bottom line is: you do never want to get your engine to be hot enough to break those deposits.

Vor 6 Tage
A Svit
A Svit

So what you’re saying is keep it at redline for a few hours

Vor 6 Tage
Qmentis
Qmentis

The Itialian tune was done whilst parked and no load to build up the heat... always used to sound bad to me.

Vor 6 Tage
Keyboard Dancers
Keyboard Dancers

drives iconic Italian marque in dispassionate fashion to deliver lecture on the Italian tune up...

Vor 6 Tage
Todd T
Todd T

Here is a list of all the cars I have driven and never redlined:

Vor 7 Tage
DIOSpeedDemon
DIOSpeedDemon

My car Red Lines at 17,000 Rpm. I take it there all the time. Not bad for a V-6. Not bad for a V-6 with 700 Brake Horse Power. Of Course my car is a Formula One Champion Race car and when I do happen to break it, the company gets some silly little mechanic to fix it for me- for free. So yes- Red Line is Good.....

Vor 7 Tage
Jerry Lifsey
Jerry Lifsey

325 degrees C = 617! degrees F

Vor 8 Tage
Chaotic Chris
Chaotic Chris

You've confirmed all the things racing teams have known/observed for years. You begin to explain it well at the 8:00 mark. At the end, I kinnnda disagree-ish....A better way to word it, would be, if your cars engine, has racing history behind it, and isn't just some commuter/putter engine, you can probably benefit from an Italian tune-up. Whether you should is another question. If you're car suffers from carbon build-up, bring your car to a certified mechanic to clean your engine how they see fit. Either way it's a great video. To further explain the racing engine history thing. Essentially, a lot of racing engines will need a few hours on the Dyno or track for "tune-up" and to "break the engine in". When doing this they often push the engine to its sustained limit, and dial in the ignition timing, compression, and boost (if any). After this they will rip the engine apart, do a full inspection to ensure parts are still in good/safe condition, and then put it back together. Often times this involves cleaning the intake valves (because those often gum up), and sometimes increasing piston size or springs. It is also common knowledge among race techs, that once this process is complete, the engine comes out with more power. NASCAR engines are usually 'spec engines' that come stock with 325HP (If I recall?) Either way every team gets the same HP engine and has to tune it to their liking from there. Often coming out with 350+HP. Rules do change over time, but the general Idea for any racing team, in any league, is to break-in the engine before throwing it at a long race. I guess this (driving your car hard to clean engine and increase power) is called the Italian tune-up partly because Ferrari claimed to get their mechanics to take customers cars around tracks. Ferrari was finding that most of their customers drove their cars slow and for short periods of time (i.e to car meets, the beech, or to dinner.) So carbon build up would choke the engines (engines designed for racing), and they would have to break it in to remove the carbon.....I'm not sure on the validity of these claims, since it might just be safer, cheaper, and less intensive to just have 1 to 3 mechanics strip the engine and clean it. Maybe they just told their customers this because it sounded cooler, and they probably would Dyno for a few mins after reassembly. Make sure it works. *shrug*

Vor 8 Tage
tonkatoytruck
tonkatoytruck

Hitting red line just to hit red line is not wise. To get the most out of your motor, put it on a dyno. That way you know where max power is made and that becomes your target rpm. Many may find that peak power is NOT at peak RPM. Second, changing your O2 sensors every 40 to 50K miles would be far better. Vacuum leaks cause rich conditions that also lead to carbon build up.

Vor 8 Tage
DCassidy42
DCassidy42

7:43 If you want to get straight to the point.

Vor 8 Tage
RavenPrecept
RavenPrecept

When I was a teenager I would occasionally drive my granny's car. This Mini would be very choked up and not rev very high when I first got in it but by the time I had come back from a 200 mile trip at 90mph it would be very responsive.

Vor 9 Tage
Eric Van Buggenhaut
Eric Van Buggenhaut

OTOH, is it really safe to record such a video while driving and focusing more on what you're telling than on the road ?

Vor 9 Tage
Todor
Todor

After redline is a blackline. This is even better for car than redline xd

Vor 10 Tage
Alvin Jiang
Alvin Jiang

My guess is that it's a dynamic process.Redlining the engine would raise up the temp but in the same time kinda worsen the working condition(less time for air intake and fuel to diffuse and mix, less time for combustion, harder control for reaching best ignition timing), so on one hand the carbon is etching away since high temp, on the other hand,much more carbon is forming.But this is all guessing, to find where the equivalent point is would need some experiments.

Vor 10 Tage
Svend Tveskæg
Svend Tveskæg

It may not be possible to excactly CLEAN an engine, that has been driven by an elderly person who was scared by revs, but it definitely is a way to KEEP the engine clean, if it was clean from the beginning. Take it out on the freeway for an occasional blast. And don´t feel sorry for it, keep the revs up there for a good while. Not redline, about 2/3 to 3/4 load. You´l notice the difference the next morning, especially if you normally does a lot of city traffic.

Vor 11 Tage
TheDownloader86
TheDownloader86

I dont have direct injection engine. Is still it in production any engine with indirect injection? :).

Vor 11 Tage
Sean O'Neill
Sean O'Neill

I like to put diesel in my gas car and yell incoherently until I stall on the highway. It does not clean my engine.

Vor 11 Tage
Dan T.
Dan T.

isnt burning carbon deposits just a longer way to say regeneration ?

Vor 12 Tage
System Error Message
System Error Message

i find that there are 2 things that help to keep the engine clean, driving very fast but not redlining, and engine braking at a high RPM. At high speeds theres lots more air so less carbons end up alone as you have more air, as with engine braking, sometimes vacuum can help the carbon deposits and dirt come out. I did this with a car that was never stressed for 4 years and the next oil change was black but it now works very well. Dont engine brake till you redline though and if you're using a manual transmission, make sure you know the velocity limits of each gear.

Vor 12 Tage
Kurk
Kurk

You don't understand chemistry much at all yet you claim to be a mechanical engineer?? Must have gone to a non ABET accredit school.

Vor 13 Tage
Jarno vm
Jarno vm

Thnx! Very interesting vid!

Vor 13 Tage
Taxi Rob
Taxi Rob

if you manage to ignite carbon deposits, you'll end up burning a hole in your piston.

Vor 14 Tage
David Mccarron
David Mccarron

nice tray but its drive it like you stole it ...... only slow driving alows the egr to open and gum up the back off the inlet valves hi reves stop it opening get rid off all egr s thy kill cars

Vor 15 Tage
Kyntteri
Kyntteri

"Is redline good"? That is like asking if binge drinking is good.

Vor 15 Tage
Johann Kuhn
Johann Kuhn

Interesting video. My carbed '87 Mazda 323 definitely benefits. If I put the wrong petrol in it (not Caltex), the engine gets extremely lazy in just one tank. But then after driving close to 200km highway, with a few near redline pulls (passing), it feels like a brand new car (actually the power is then better than new).

Vor 16 Tage
Rotor Thermotech
Rotor Thermotech

Hmmmmm, how about the valves you talked about recently that were internally cooled, maybe not so good for carbon buildup ?

Vor 16 Tage
Bobby Murray
Bobby Murray

Could this be something that originated with older vehicles? I remember my grandfather, who was a mechanic, saying he used to push his cars hard to "blow off carbon." At his age, I'm pretty sure he was dealing with carburated engines back in the 60's & 70's that did not have Fuel Injection.

Vor 16 Tage
bluwng
bluwng

Is that car borrowed. I'm an aerospace engineer and I can't afford that car.

Vor 16 Tage
ed ha
ed ha

My money's on this cure being worse than the disease. The engine's designers surely figger on a little carbon in there.

Vor 17 Tage
Roland Chevrier
Roland Chevrier

The reason you came here 8:52

Vor 19 Tage
S1000RR Ant
S1000RR Ant

Hard break in vs soft

Vor 19 Tage
Timothy Stewart
Timothy Stewart

What about the mechanical hammering an intake valve would go through at redline? It would seem to my feeble mind that it would help break deposits up.

Vor 19 Tage
Mike Kay
Mike Kay

I think the term "Italian tune up" is referring to older cars that are carbureted, not modern day injected cars.

Vor 19 Tage
broncokonco
broncokonco

I don't think engine/component temps are the only thing contributing to the "tune up" effect. Higher velocity fluid flow should have an effect as well.

Vor 20 Tage
Alessandro Guarda
Alessandro Guarda

Uhm, I'm from Milan (Italy), I work on engines in my spare time since when I was 15 (now I'm 43), and this is the very first time I hear about the "Italian tune up"... Is this american slang or what?

Vor 21 Tag
Alessandro Guarda
Alessandro Guarda

+Engineering Explained thanks mate. I can only think that it originated there because Italian's performance engines are generally quite high revving. You're doing a good job with these videos and the studies you do behind the scenes. Good luck from Italy. PS: what about some video on 180+hp / 13500rpm 4 cylinders motorcycle engines? :)

Vor 21 Tag
Engineering Explained
Engineering Explained

According to Road & Track (or maybe it was C&D), it originated in Italy. But I mean there are lots of things that have originated in America that I have no idea about haha

Vor 21 Tag
Erik Axzell
Erik Axzell

Great video. Thanks

Vor 22 Tage
Stephen McCoy
Stephen McCoy

Spraying a mist of water into your air intake can remove deposits as well as completely destroying your engine if you're not careful. I would love to see a video of this, I believe it was used by the airforce of old as a means of decoking their engines.

Vor 22 Tage
Krbulja stil
Krbulja stil

Our experience, yes, it is "good" for the car, as far as the removing of carbon composites goes (tons of other reasons why not to do it, but we still do it). As far as the removing of carbon, yeah, works, we took a look at intake manifold when car was bought, filled with EGR gunk... 2 years of regular redlining, almost clean as brand new... sure it is an italian car, so maybe it prefers the italian tune up :D

Vor 22 Tage
Dean MacCrone
Dean MacCrone

If you drive your car gently in the city AND before it reaches operating temperature AND do at least 2 hours of highway a week your engine will last a long time, as mine do. Change that oil every 5000km though, whether regular or synthetic.

Vor 22 Tage
GazMk2 RC
GazMk2 RC

I’ve always been a great believer that winding the engine out now and then does it good. Not all day every day mind! Lol. But certainly once in a journey.

Vor 22 Tage
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique

they should nickel plate valves. nickle is slippery - I like slippery nickles.

Vor 22 Tage
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique

the runout on that crankshaft lol

Vor 22 Tage
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique

it's not a two stroke engine

Vor 22 Tage
Hahodi d
Hahodi d

Does carbon form on Wankel's?

Vor 23 Tage
John Callaghan
John Callaghan

Petrol engine, 5500 -6000 rpm over a 12-15 minute period, maybe. I never do that, and I am sure I am currently having that problem. I have the bad habit of driving my petrol like a diesel, 1200-2100 rpm, and 2800 on the highway. In my case, I should need a 15 minute drive on the highway... in third gear at 80-90 mph... I don't think I will do that.

Vor 23 Tage
nos145
nos145

What about water methanol injection ?

Vor 23 Tage
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique

Forgedddaboutit!!!

Vor 22 Tage
Lawson Palmer
Lawson Palmer

You should have touched on the idea behind rotary engines requiring the occasional redline to clear the oil out of the housings!

Vor 23 Tage
TheBroseph1000
TheBroseph1000

interestingly enough, i’m italian and when i was a kid, my father used to talk about taking my mother’s car on the highway every once in a while because she didn’t do any highway driving. he didn’t call it an italian tune up or anything, all he said was that it “cleans the carbon off”.

Vor 24 Tage
Shorne Pubique
Shorne Pubique

yeah if you're italian you don't call your own food italian food you just eat your food like mama make ey. but a white arsehole like me will call italian food, italian food because i grew up eating butter menthols and werthers originals.

Vor 22 Tage
Michael R
Michael R

Did he once floor the pedal of the Maserati?! Didn't want to watch the whole video, but would be a shame, if he didn't. Concerning the 'redline wash', I think, Germany without speed limits on the Autobahn is the only place where you can really and legally do that, so it would work. But I actually think modern engines are better at coping with all kinds of problems. So, I won't drive my car near redline for a long time. It's probably more harmful than benefitting...

Vor 24 Tage
Allan Richter
Allan Richter

So it works when you're in the Autobahn 90% of the time. But what does it say about your pet snail Garret? Won't all of the carbon deposit stick to the relatively cooler fins on the turbo?

Vor 24 Tage
Engineering Explained
Engineering Explained

Turbo fins get quite hot when you’re on it!

Vor 24 Tage
Razor Jimmy
Razor Jimmy

Tl dr yes always rev to redline and keep it there for a minute thanks

Vor 24 Tage
SimonBelgium
SimonBelgium

1. How about the extra (gas) pressure related to high RPMs? Exhaust gasses get rather hot, so buildup in the exhaust or Turbo should get cleaned out nicely, and the high pressure should help blow out a lot as well, due to the high speed. 2. Why would carbon buildup happen on the intake valves, other then on the valve disc inside the cylinder? You shouldn't have exhaust gas in your intake manifold? 3. There are so many people who've experienced the Italian tune-up working, so it's a real thing. But it may not "just" be carbon buildup then? 4. For engines having EGR, and thus getting that crap in the intake, the greater heat from the exhaust side should start cleaning the EGR out though? I understand there is only "so much" research material available, but a few hours driving around on the back roads, like that mountain road in your video, in high RPMs and pulling strongly regularly, should do just the trick to warm everything up nicely and burn that carbon right up.

Vor 24 Tage
Steve Nelson
Steve Nelson

rotary owners rise up

Vor 24 Tage
Cardboard Silver
Cardboard Silver

After putting better fuel and a Seafoam treatment, I did a few Italian Tunes, and my exhaust tips went black! Car runs a lot smoother though!

Vor 25 Tage
Maciej Mendel
Maciej Mendel

There's one more factor- the airflow speed. With high flows I can imagine some of the buildup could crack and simply fell off. Especially on the valves. It doesn't have to be all about the temperature.

Vor 25 Tage
Martin Tebb
Martin Tebb

Well I've only ever really worked on the internals on 1 engine and the only noticeable carbon deposits I saw was in pitting on the valve seats. Removing it from them without re-seating the valves is going to reduce performance due to lost of cylinder pressure. That engine was older than me though so I don't know if modern cars get pitting, or I guess it depend on the quality.

Vor 25 Tage
lancelot1953
lancelot1953

Hi Jason, would red-line operation (or close-to it) would eventually decrease the life-expectancy of your engine. We had done a study at Ford, on race car engines, looking at the probability of major structural failure) in race conditions (in the sixties and again in the eighties/nineties). The intent here was to estimate the risk that a race car driver was taking over-revving the engine (in a win or loose situation). I had similar studies in my Naval jet flying career where you could over speed the turbine in a dire situation. Operations over the "red line" or max rpm (within some limits) resulted in "acceptable safety risk" (say +10% max for less than 5 min). All redline or beyond operation were logged and recorded by engine sensors and would affect engine life. What do you think - this is "old engineer" stuff - we did not have the computing power and testing beds that your newer engineers benefit from. Great video, Ciao, L

Vor 25 Tage
THE CAR WATCH
THE CAR WATCH

I have a question. If a car is equiped with an lpg conversion kit, would it make better results driving your car hard while on lpg, becouse lpg burns hotter than gasoline, or is it bad to drive hard on lpg.

Vor 25 Tage
Peter Lemonjello
Peter Lemonjello

is he mixing up Celsius & Fahrenheit ?

Vor 25 Tage
Andrew Wenner
Andrew Wenner

I think its more of the combo of heat and pressure flowing through the engine too, more fuel, more pressure...

Vor 25 Tage
f u google
f u google

"I dont understand chemistry at all, but its a reaction called decarboxylation. I will summarize it for you peasants" I love this guy

Vor 26 Tage
Ari Koenig
Ari Koenig

Do you like Valvoline maxlife or Castrol gtx high mileage oil?

Vor 26 Tage
Ari Koenig
Ari Koenig

Wow! What happened to the Acura?

Vor 26 Tage
Cheepchipsable
Cheepchipsable

This seems to be a throwback to older cars, especially two-strokes where if they weren't driven much or only had very light work soot and other deposits would build up and the car would run poorly. The solution was to give the vehicle a good run and rev the crap out of it. Usually it would be accompanied by plooms of smoke. Vehicles weren't as efficient and the design has improved, along with engine management. People seem to forget engines are designed to be run within certain parameters, go outside those parameters and there will be a side effect. The Italian tune up might work for engines that are under utilised, but it won't do much for engine operating under normal conditions.

Vor 26 Tage
Tepid Tuna
Tepid Tuna

I have a direct injection engine with turbo and it runs slightly rich. It suffers from carbon build up. I have had some detonation due to the carbon. The Service Centre can do a water blast down the intake if it gets too bad. With my older port injected engines a drive in the country for 3-4 hours with some spirited application of the right foot, at times, usually has the car returning in a "good state of tune", as do long trips 400-600 miles on the highway. The car feels smoother, more responsive, and slightly better power and economy.

Vor 26 Tage
Ian Edmonds
Ian Edmonds

Do redex or similar fuel additives work? They claim to do similar sort of things by increasing the octane rating letting your timing advance so the fuel burns hotter once it burns? Luv and Peace.

Vor 26 Tage
Austin Allmond
Austin Allmond

I drive like a bat out of hell, and when I seafoamed my engine a couple weeks ago, it didn't smoke at all.

Vor 26 Tage
GiorGiTeV
GiorGiTeV

My Mercedes has the OM-605, the redline starts at 5000 but I think RPM limiter is at 6000rpm, is it safe to redline? I rarely rev & accelerate, because it's my daily, i usually just accelerate to take the webs outta the intake xD

Vor 26 Tage
longbowdt
longbowdt

what about the catalytic converter downstream of the exhaust? Can these carbon particles clog, and maybe damage the converter? Good video, btw.

Vor 26 Tage
Jamnation
Jamnation

Can the same be said for Diesel engines since they maybe running at higher temps?

Vor 26 Tage
Aldrich Quai Hoi
Aldrich Quai Hoi

A dash of avgas helps as well as good period of idling to get the engine nice and toasty for that tuneup drive it slow, then burn it up, then cruise back home

Vor 26 Tage
Jeffery Antioquia
Jeffery Antioquia

I've always just assumed this worked. without the science backing... I recently changed the spark plugs on my new vehicle. and noticed the carbon build up was quite... well let's just say. the previous owner must not have driven it to its potential.. ever? I'll pull the plugs and take pictures and then drive it a little harder this week to and from work. will reply with what I've got afterwards. 99 vw passat 1.8t

Vor 26 Tage
Engineering Explained
Engineering Explained

Neat, thanks for sharing, looking forward to your update!

Vor 26 Tage
Ben
Ben

I believe it does help somehow. Going near redline occasionally supposedly helps with long term reliability. Also I fixed my brakes by doing some testing at a Track :D I mean they weren't bad but they were much better and quieter after giving them a little work out on the track.

Vor 26 Tage
Tony Nameless
Tony Nameless

You sometimes should hit the red line to clear out your exhaust. Ever notice horrible smell driving behind some old lady car going up hill ? That is because she is stepping on it to get it moving. And smell is all the crap she had in the head and the exhaust being thrown out due to high RPM and engine load that her car normally does not experience. If you not afraid to step on the gas here and there, sometimes spin the tires on a wet day, then you dont need this Italian clean up. But if you are an old lady who does not get passed 3000 RPM going to the store 2 miles away for groceries, then you should get that clean up process once or twice every year.

Vor 26 Tage
acefighterpilot
acefighterpilot

It seems counter intuitive that modern direct injection turbocharged engines would suffer more extreme carbon deposition under load than idle. One would expect the significantly higher intake air temperatures concomitant with turbocharging to prevent or decompose carbon formation on the intake valves as is the case with naturally aspirated port injection engines. I would be very interested in seeing a comparison of direct injection carbon formation among turbocharged vehicles of varying intercooler size and efficiency to determine if intake air temperature has any bearing on carbon accumulation, assuming similar DI, EGR, and PCV equipment.

Vor 26 Tage

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